Mind your language! A handy list of substitutes for some tired workplace jargon

Managerial language, suitspeak, weasel words… it’s hard to say exactly what we dislike about them, and why we groan inwardly when we hear one. They start as buzzwords, then worm their way into our consciousness and become part of our own language. When it’s time to write a report or blog post, we can’t find an alternative.

Here’s a short list of some clichés to avoid like the plague (did you see what I did there?) and some substitutes.

They won’t work in every situation, because clear writing depends largely on context and audience. Try them when next you write an article for social media or copy for your website. You might find your prose starts to cut through the noise, like an opera singer at a football game.

The examples I’ve used were collected over two days on LinkedIn and Facebook, plus a couple of websites I routinely consult.

But what’s wrong with these terms?

1. Sometimes your readers/customers won’t understand the terminology you use because it’s just not part of their world. Some of them are just plain hard to understand.

2. Their tone is often evasive and indirect. Most of the time, plain, direct language would be more suited to what you’re trying to convey. Here’s a real example:

‘[xxx] gives you and your account manager visibility over which elements of your content marketing are actually working by collecting data across all your activities.’

If they said something like the following I would understand what they propose to do for me – and I’d be more likely to feel I could work with them.

You and your account manager can see what parts of your content marketing are effective, because we measure them for you.

And, most importantly,

3. It makes you sound just like everybody else. Content marketing is everywhere. Just one platform, LinkedIn, had 467 million users at last count. That’s a lot of competition for attention. Why sound like a corporate drone when you can say things in a fresh, original style?

Words to stop using. Just don’t.

Innovate. Everybody’s innovating so routinely that the term has become meaningless. Same for passionate, iconic, savvy and unicorns. Challenges and solutions. They’re tired and worn out, so give them a rest.

There’s a great book on the topic. In Who Touched Base in my Thought Shower? A Treasury of Unbearable Office Jargon, author Steven Poole says that while there’s nothing wrong with jargon in context, we can ‘fight back against the filthy tide of verbal slurry that treats us like idiotic automata every day’.

The battle starts with you.

What workplace words do you find unbearable? Do you have a simpler substitute?

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