The time-saving magic of an editorial style guide

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Just some of the style guides on the market

How a style guide saves you time and money and helps you communicate your brand

A style guide saves time and money and helps communicate your brand. When I edit material for different clients, I could spend a lot of time deciding whether to use Oxford commas, capitalise job titles, or start a sentence with ‘And’. Fortunately, I am usually given an editorial style guide to follow. I add a style sheet, where I record all the decisions I make as I go along. Using a style guide means I don’t confuse different clients’ house styles, and I don’t have to check back through the document to check what I did the last time I made a change. It’s all there in the editorial style guide.

You can also use a style guide such as the Australian Government Style Manual, which is the basis for many corporate style guides. The ABC has one too, as does the Plain English Foundation.

Why use an editorial style guide?

An editorial style guide will help you to:

  • Establish the ‘voice’ of your brand
  • Collaborate effectively with other authors
  • Be consistent in communicating with your clients
  • Save time when creating content

An editorial style guide is essential when you are trying to write clear, consistent, professional content that communicates your brand. Using a style guide cuts time spent on the mechanics of writing, freeing you up to concentrate on your great ideas. Multi-author documents will have a coherent tone and style, because you share the style guide with anybody who creates content for your organisation. That means less time spent briefing contributors and editing reports or newsletters.

Media organisations, publishers, universities and governments have style guides hundreds of pages long. Most small businesses don’t need that level of detail. A simple style guide that covers the most important points is enough. As you grow, you can add to the guide as needed. Remember, it’s not a grammar manual, but a record of the preferred usage in your organisation.

Keep track of how language changes

Language changes – sometimes quite fast. Writing ‘e-mail’ seems antiquated now, but that hyphen was considered correct not that long ago. Don’t be afraid to update your style, and use the style sheet to record your changes. Make sure everybody has the up-to-date version.

The style sheet is also useful for recording any industry-specific terms and abbreviations you use. I use mine to keep track of the spellings and usages I constantly stumble over. I edit with the style sheet for a particular client to hand, so I have a ready list of their specific usages. A style sheet in use may look like this.

Using a simple style sheet helps you track your editing decisions

Download  your editorial style guide here


Do you have a style questions? Please contact me and I will help.

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